Cooking Sake | Bokksu Market

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Morita Cooking Sake

Morita Cooking Sake

Regular $6.99
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This cooking sake is made with the same techniques that are used to brew NENOHI refined drinking sake. Its carefully selected rice creates a full-bodied fragrance that reflects five main flavors - sweet, bitter, umami, salty, and acid. This is why cooking sake is great for enhancing distinctive ingredient flavors and neutralizing the unpleasant smells of meats and fish. An unsung hero in many sauces and marinades, this cooking sake will take your cooking, Japanese or otherwise, to the next level.


Disclaimer: Product descriptions on Bokksu Market are for informational purposes only. Learn More

Morita Cooking Sake

Regular $6.99
/

Disclaimer

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Bokksu is not responsible for the accuracy of the products’ nutritional or allergen information. Warning: California’s Proposition 65 may be in effect. For more information,visit www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.

Some Bokksu Market products are produced overseas and may have a Production Date printed on the packaging, rather than a Best Buy Date as is standard in North America. If your product appears expired, do not be alarmed! This is most likely the Production Date. All items have been double checked to ensure they are not expired and safe to eat.

What Are The Different Types of Asian Cooking Wines?

Sake is a clear, dry alcoholic Japanese rice wine, also drunk as a beverage. Shaoxing wine is an amber-colored Chinese rice wine. Shaoxing is rich in both protein and flavor, and has a strong umami depth. Mirin is a sweet, clear Japanese rice wine. Michiu is the Chinese version of fermented rice wine, with a stronger taste than mirin. 

How To Cook With Asian Wines

Cooking wine is primarily used to reduce or remove greasiness from any heavy dishes like meat or fish. As the alcohol present in the cooking wine reaches a sufficient heat, it’ll begin to boil, and when the alcohol evaporates, it takes the unpleasant smells with it. 

Cooking wine can also help to tenderize meat. The acids present in the rice wine penetrate the meat’s tissue and break a little of it down, which results in a tastier and more tender bite.